Thai CPF claims anti-slavery laws

Thai CPF claims anti-slavery laws

The business issued a statement from its human resources department to confirm it was committed to meet Thailand’s new migrant labour law, brought in after the country’s chicken industry was rocked last year by modern-day slavery claims. Sawang Suksri, CPF’s senior vice-president of human resources said that the company wanted to ensure its foreign workers felt that they were paid and treated fairly.

Charoen Pokphand Food employs 8800 migrant workers, making it up to 18% of the company’s workforce. The majority of this migrant workers come from Cambodia and Myanmar. The migrant workers are employed across CPF’s feed mills, cutting sites and food processing plants.

The new rules offer that all migrant staff is entitled to the same salary and benefits that a normal CPF Thai workers will get. This will include beside medical expenses and insurance also pay increases by performance. The migrants are living in dormitories of CPF and taken to factories by company bus with translators recruited to liaise with the migrant workers.

Cambodia’s Ministry of Labour already awarded CPF with a certificate that the business of CPF offers the best practices in the protection of migrant workers.